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Including students with special needs: a practical guide for classroom teachers

Including students with special needs: a practical guide for classroom teachers

Friend, Marilyn Penovich, 1953- author; Bursuck, William D., author

This single most-adopted Inclusion text worldwide continues to provide the best source of practical strategies for teaching students with special needs in inclusive settings.  Filled with examples and vignettes, the emphasis is always on teaching methods that promote student independence at all education levels.  Its non-categorical approach helps teachers ensure all students’ success regardless of their specific categories of exceptionality.    The Sixth edition integrates today’s expectations for students with the authors’ strong commitment to inclusive practices, tempered by the realities of day-today teaching. This text provides teachers with a firm grounding in special education practices, an understanding of the professionals who support these students and the procedures followed to ensure their rights are upheld, and a wealth of research-based strategies and interventions that can foster their success

eBook, Paperback, Electronic resource, Book. English.
Pearson new international edition.
Published Harlow, Essex : Pearson 2014
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Details

Statement of responsibility: Marilyn Friend, William D. Bursuck
ISBN: 1292021411, 9781292021416
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: 492 pages : illustrations (black and white, and colour) ; 28 cm.
Series: Pearson custom library
Subject: Inclusive education United States.; Children with disabilities Education United States.; Special education United States.; Mainstreaming in education United States.

Contents

  1. Glossary
  2. C H A P T E R 1 The Foundation for Educating Students with Special Needs
  3. Learning Objectives
  4. What Key Terms and Concepts Define Special Education?
  5. Special Education Services
  6. Least Restrictive Environment
  7. Inclusive Practices
  8. How Did Today’s Special Education Services Come to Exist?
  9. The Development of Education for Students with Disabilities
  10. The Impact of the Civil Rights Movement on Special Education
  11. The Legislative Basis for Contemporary Special Education
  12. What Factors Influence Practices in Today’s Schools?
  13. Legislative and Related Policies
  14. Understanding of Inclusive Practices
  15. Impact on Students, Parents, and Educators
  16. Limited Resources
  17. Putting the Pieces Together
  18. Who Receives Special Education and Other Special Services?
  19. Categories of Disability in Federal Law
  20. A Cross-Categorical Approach to Special Education
  21. Other Students with Special Needs
  22. Wrapping it Up
  23. Back to the Cases
  24. Summary
  25. Applications in Teaching Practice:Understanding Contemporary Special
  26. Education
  27. C H A P T E R 2 Special Education Procedures and Services
  28. Learning Objectives
  29. Who Are the Professionals in Special Education?
  30. General Education Teachers
  31. Special Education Teachers
  32. Related Service Providers and Other Specialists
  33. Parents and Students
  34. How Can You Decide Whether a Student Need Might
  35. Be a Disability?
  36. Analyze Unmet Needs
  37. Communicate Your Observations and Try Your Own Interventions
  38. How Do Students Obtain Special Services?
  39. Initial Consideration of Student Problems
  40. The Special Education Referral, Assessment, Eligibility, Planning, and Placement Process
  41. Decision Making for Special Services
  42. Monitoring Special Education Services
  43. What Is an Individualized Education Program?
  44. Required Components of an IEP
  45. The Value of IEPs
  46. What Services Do Students with Disabilities Receive?
  47. Special Education and Related Services
  48. Student Placement and Educational Environments
  49. Wrapping it Up
  50. Back to the Cases
  51. Summary
  52. Applications in Teaching Practice: A Visit to an MDT Meeting
  53. C H A P T E R 3 Building Partnerships through Collaboration
  54. Learning Objectives
  55. What Are the Basics of Collaboration?
  56. Characteristics of Collaboration
  57. What Collaborative Services in Schools Foster Inclusion
  58. Shared Problem Solving
  59. Co-Teaching
  60. Working on a Team
  61. Consultation
  62. The Complexity of Professional Collaboration
  63. How Can You Work Effectively with Parents?
  64. Understanding the Perspective of Family Members
  65. Parents’ Reactions to Their Child’s Disability
  66. Collaborating with Parents
  67. How Can You Work Effectively with Paraprofessionals?
  68. Understanding Your Working Relationship with Paraprofessionals
  69. Collaborating with Paraprofessionals
  70. The Complexity of Collaborating with Paraprofessionals
  71. Wrapping it Up
  72. Back to the Cases
  73. Suumary
  74. Applications in Teaching Practice: Collaboration in the Washington
  75. School District
  76. C H A P T E R 4 Assessing Student Needs
  77. Learner Objectives
  78. How Do Your Student Assessments Contribute
  79. to Special Education Decisions?
  80. Screening
  81. Diagnosis
  82. Program Placement
  83. Curriculum Placement
  84. Instructional Evaluation
  85. Program Evaluation
  86. What Information Sources Are Used in Programming
  87. for Students with Special Needs?
  88. High-Stakes Achievement Tests
  89. Standardized Achievement Tests
  90. Psychological Tests
  91. Alternate Assessments
  92. Curriculum-Based Assessments
  93. What Kinds of Curriculum-Based Assessments Can You Create for Your Students?
  94. Probes of Basic Academic Skills
  95. Content-Area Assessments
  96. How Are Curriculum-Based Probes Used to Make Special Education Decisions?
  97. Peer Comparison in Screening
  98. Fluency and Accuracy in Diagnosis
  99. Skill Mastery and Curriculum Placement
  100. Monitoring Student Progress and Instructional Evaluation
  101. Wrapping it Up
  102. Back to the Cases
  103. Summary
  104. Applications in Teaching Practice: Collecting and Using Assessment
  105. Information
  106. C H A P T E R 5 Planning Instruction by Analyzing Classroom
  107. and Student Needs
  108. Learning Objectives
  109. How Can the INCLUDE Strategy Help You Make Reasonable Accommodations for Students with Special Needs?
  110. Step 1: Identify Classroom Demands
  111. Step 2: Note Student Learning Strengths and Needs
  112. Step 3: Check for Potential Areas of Student Success
  113. Step 4: Look for Potential Problem Areas
  114. Step 5: Use Information to Brainstorm Ways to Differentiate Instruction
  115. Step 6: Differentiate Instruction
  116. Step 7: Evaluate Student Progress
  117. How Is an Inclusive Classroom Managed?
  118. Physical Organization
  119. Routines for Classroom Business
  120. Classroom Climate
  121. Behavior Management
  122. Use of Time
  123. How Can You Group All Your Students for Instruction in Inclusive Classrooms?
  124. Whole-Class or Large-Group Instruction
  125. Small-Group Instruction
  126. One-to-One Instruction
  127. How Can You Evaluate Instructional Materials for Inclusive Classrooms?
  128. Learning Outcomes
  129. Textbooks
  130. Manipulatives and Models
  131. Technology
  132. How Can You Analyze Instructional Methods in Relation to Student Needs?
  133. Elements of Direct Instruction
  134. Indirect Methods of Instruction
  135. Scaffolding
  136. Independent Student Practice
  137. Evaluation of Student Performance
  138. Wrapping it Up
  139. Summary
  140. Back to the Cases
  141. Applications in Teaching Practice: Planning Accommodations in the Instructional
  142. Environment
  143. C H A P T E R 6 Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities
  144. Learning Objectives
  145. What Are Low-Incidence Disabilities?
  146. What Accommodations Can You Make for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders?
  147. Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
  148. Students with Asperger Syndrome
  149. Accommodations for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
  150. What Accommodations Can You Make for Students with Moderate, Severe, or Multiple Disabilities?
  151. Students with Moderate to Severe Intellectual Disabilities
  152. Students with Multiple Disabilities
  153. Deaf-Blindness
  154. What Accommodations Can You Make for Students with Sensory Impairments?
  155. Students with Visual Impairments
  156. Accommodations for Students with Visual Impairments
  157. Planning Instruction for Students with Visual Impairments
  158. Students with Hearing Loss
  159. Accommodations for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
  160. What Accommodations Can You Make for Students with Physical, Medical, or Health Disabilities?
  161. Orthopedic Impairments
  162. Teaching Students with Orthopedic Impairments
  163. Other Health Impairments
  164. Traumatic Brain Injury
  165. Wrapping it Up
  166. Back to the Cases
  167. Summary
  168. Applications in Teaching Practice: Planning for Students with
  169. Low-Incidence Disabilities
  170. C H A P T E R 7 Students with High-Incidence Disabilities
  171. Learning Objectives
  172. What Are High-Incidence Disabilities?
  173. What Accommodations Can You Make for Students with Communication Disorders?
  174. Understanding Speech Problems
  175. Understanding Language Problems
  176. Accommodations for Students with Communication Disorders
  177. What Are the Academic Needs of Students with Learning and Behavioral Disabilities?
  178. Reading Skills
  179. Written Language Skills
  180. Math Skills
  181. Learning Skills
  182. What Are the Social and Emotional Needs of Students with Learning and Behavioral Disabilities?
  183. Interpersonal Skills
  184. Personal and Psychological Adjustment
  185. What Accommodations Can You Make for Students with Learning and Behavioral Disabilities?
  186. Addressing Academic Needs
  187. Addressing Social and Emotional Needs
  188. Wrapping it Up
  189. Back to the Cases
  190. Summary
  191. Applications in Teaching Practice: Using the INCLUDE Strategy with Students
  192. with High-Incidence Disabilities
  193. C H A P T E R 8 Students with Special Needs Other Than Disabilities
  194. Learning Objectives
  195. Which Students Are Protected by Section 504?
  196. Understanding Section 504
  197. Students Eligible for Services under Section 504
  198. How Can You Accommodate Students with Attention Deficit—Hyperactivity Disorder?
  199. Characteristics and Needs of Students with Attention Deficit—Hyperactivity Disorder
  200. Interventions for Students with Attention Deficit—Hyperactivity Disorder
  201. Families of Children with Attention Deficit—Hyperactivity Disorder
  202. How Can You Accommodate Students Who Are Gifted and Talented?
  203. Characteristics and Needs of Students Who Are Gifted and Talented
  204. Interventions for Students Who Are Gifted and Talented
  205. What Are the Needs of Students from Culturally Diverse Backgrounds?
  206. Diversity and Special Education
  207. Cultural Awareness
  208. Families and Diversity
  209. Multicultural and Bilingual Education
  210. How Can You Meet the Needs of Students Who Are at Risk?
  211. Characteristics and Needs of Students at Risk
  212. Interventions for Students at Risk
  213. Wrapping it Up
  214. Back to the Cases
  215. Summary
  216. Applications in Teaching Practice: Diversity in a High School Class
  217. C H A P T E R 9 Differentiating Instruction
  218. Learning Objectives
  219. How Can You Make Accommodations for Students with Special Needs in Basic Skills Instruction?
  220. Teaching Preskills
  221. Selecting and Sequencing Examples
  222. Deciding the Rate of Introduction of New Skills
  223. Providing Direct Instruction and Opportunities for Practice and Review
  224. How Can You Make Accommodations for Students with Special Needs When Teaching Subject-Area Content?
  225. Activating Background Knowledge
  226. Organizing Content
  227. Teaching Terms and Concepts
  228. How Can You Improve Clarity in Written and Oral Communication?
  229. Clarity in Written Communication
  230. Clarity in Oral Communication
  231. How Can You Involve Parents in Teaching Their Children?
  232. What Accommodations Can You Make for Students to Help Them Succeed in Independent Practice?
  233. Differentiating Seatwork Assignments
  234. Differentiating Learning Center Activities
  235. Differentiating Homework Assignments
  236. Making Instructional Modifications for Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities
  237. Wrapping it Up
  238. Back to the Cases
  239. Summary
  240. Applications in Teaching Practice: Developing a Repertoire of Instructional Accommodations
  241. C H A P T E R 10 Strategies for Independent Learning
  242. Learning Objectives
  243. How Can You Encourage Student Self-Awareness and Self-Advocacy?
  244. How Can You Effectively Teach Independent Learning Strategies in Class?
  245. Assess Current Strategy Use
  246. Clarify Expectations
  247. Demonstrate Strategy Use
  248. Encourage Students to Memorize Strategy Steps
  249. Provide Guided and Independent Practice
  250. Administer Posttests
  251. What Are Some Examples of Successful Learning Strategies?
  252. Word-Identification and Reading Fluency Strategies
  253. Vocabulary Strategies
  254. Reading Comprehension Strategies
  255. Listening and Note-Taking Strategies
  256. Writing Strategies
  257. Strategies for Using Technology to Improve Student Writing
  258. Strategies for Problem Solving in Math
  259. Strategies for Managing Time and Resources
  260. How Can Students Learn to Use Strategies Independently?
  261. Self-Instruction
  262. Self-Monitoring
  263. Self-Questioning
  264. Wrapping it Up
  265. Back to the Cases
  266. Summary
  267. Applications in Teaching Practice: Designing Strategies for Independence
  268. C H A P T E R 11 Evaluating Student Learning
  269. Learning Objectives
  270. How Can Accommodations Be Made for Students with Special Needs When Giving Classroom Tests?
  271. Accommodations before the Test
  272. Accommodations during the Test
  273. Accommodations after the Test
  274. How Can Accommodations in Report-Card Grading Be Made for Students with Special Needs?
  275. Grading Practices That Benefit All Students
  276. Using Individualized Grading with Students with Disabilities
  277. How Can Performance-Based Assessment Benefit Students with Special Needs?
  278. How Can Portfolio Assessment Benefit Students with Special Needs?
  279. Wrapping it Up
  280. Back to the Cases
  281. Summary
  282. Applications in Teaching Practice: Making Accommodations When Evaluating Students with Special Needs
  283. C H A P T E R 12 Responding to Student Behavior
  284. Learning Objectives
  285. What Are Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports?
  286. How Can You Use Positive Behavior Supports to Prevent Discipline Problems?
  287. Instructional Environments Conducive to Learning
  288. Effective Classroom Communication
  289. Effective Teaching Methods
  290. Fostering Positive Student Interactions
  291. Schoolwide Strategies
  292. How Can You Promote Positive Group Behavior?
  293. Implement Peer Mediated Instruction
  294. Use Group Contingencies
  295. What Are Positive Behavior Strategies for Responding to Minor Individual Behaviors?
  296. Use Minimum Interventions
  297. Manage Students’ Surface Behaviors
  298. How Can Functional Behavior Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plans Help You Respond to Serious Individual Behaviors?
  299. Rationale for Functional Behavior Assessment
  300. Verifying the Seriousness of the Problem
  301. Defining the Problem Behavior
  302. Collecting Data to Better Understand the Behavior
  303. Analyzing the Data and Forming Hypotheses
  304. Developing a Behavior Intervention Plan
  305. Implementing the Plan
  306. Monitoring the Plan’s Effectiveness
  307. What Are Effective Strategies for Responding to Serious Individual Behaviors?
  308. Increasing Desirable Behaviors
  309. Decreasing Undesirable Behaviors
  310. Using Behavior Contracts
  311. How Can You Help Students Manage Their Own Behavior?
  312. Cognitive Behavior Management Strategies
  313. Teaching Cognitive Behavior Management Strategies
  314. Final Thoughts about Including Students with Special Needs and the INCLUDE Strategy
  315. Wrapping it Up
  316. Back to the Cases
  317. Summary
  318. Applications in Teaching Practice: Developing Strategies for Responding
  319. to Individual Student Behavior
  320. Appendix: CEC Content Standards and INTASC Core Principles
  321. References
  322. Name Index
  323. Subject Index

Description

This single most-adopted Inclusion text worldwide continues to provide the best source of practical strategies for teaching students with special needs in inclusive settings.  Filled with examples and vignettes, the emphasis is always on teaching methods that promote student independence at all education levels.  Its non-categorical approach helps teachers ensure all students’ success regardless of their specific categories of exceptionality. 

 

The Sixth edition integrates today’s expectations for students with the authors’ strong commitment to inclusive practices, tempered by the realities of day-today teaching. This text provides teachers with a firm grounding in special education practices, an understanding of the professionals who support these students and the procedures followed to ensure their rights are upheld, and a wealth of research-based strategies and interventions that can foster their success.