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The novelty of newspapers: Victorian fiction after the invention of the news

The novelty of newspapers: Victorian fiction after the invention of the news

Rubery, Matthew, author

Focusing on five diverse narrative conventions: the shipping intelligence, personal advertisement, leading article, interview, and foreign correspondence, this work shows journalism's concrete influence on the novel in the Victorian era

Paperback, Book. English.
Published New York: Oxford University Press, 2014
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Details

Statement of responsibility: Matthew Rubery
ISBN: 0195369270, 9780195369274
Intended audience: Specialized.
Note: Originally published: 2009.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: 248 pages : illustrations (black and white) ; 24 cm
Subject: Newspapers; English novels; Victorian period; British newspapers History 19th century.; Newspapers in literature.; Journalism and literature Great Britain History 19th century.; English fiction 19th century History and criticism.; Literature.; Press Great Britain History 19th century.

Author note

Matthew Rubery is a Reader in Nineteenth-Century Literature at Queen Mary, University of London. He is the editor or coeditor of Audiobooks, Literature, and Sound Studies (Routledge, 2011) and Secret Commissions: An Anthology of Victorian Investigative Journalism (Broadview, 2012).

Description

Arising in the 1800s and soon drawing a million readers a day, the commercial press profoundly influenced the work of Brontë, Braddon, Dickens, Conrad, James, Trollope, and others who mined print journalism for fictional techniques. Five of the most important of these narrative conventions-the shipping intelligence, personal advertisement, leading article, interview, and foreign correspondence-show how the Victorian novel is best understood alongside the

simultaneous development of newspapers. In highly original analyses of Victorian fiction, this study also captures the surprising ways in which public media enabled the expression of private feeling among ordinary readers: from the trauma caused by a lover's reported suicide to the vicarious gratification felt

during a celebrity interview; from the distress at finding one's behavior the subject of unflattering editorial commentary to the apprehension of distant cultures through the foreign correspondence. Combining a wealth of historical research with a series of astute close readings, The Novelty of Newspapers breaks down the assumed divide between the epoch's literature and journalism and demonstrates that newsprint was integral to the development of the novel.