Skip to Content
Dyslexia: a practitioner's handbook

Dyslexia: a practitioner's handbook

Reid, Gavin, 1950- author

Newly updated, Gavin Reid's best-selling handbook remains an essential resource for those helping dyslexic individuals of all ages, from preschoolers to adults in the workplace

Paperback, Book. English.
Fifth edition.
Published Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley Blackwell, 2016
Rate this

Available: Newton Park

  • Newton Park – One available in Main Collection 371.9144/REI

    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    00343606 Main Collection 371.9144/REI Standard Available

Details

Statement of responsibility: Gavin Reid
ISBN: 1118980107, 9781118980101
Intended audience: Specialized.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: xxiii, 478 pages : illustrations (black and white) ; 25 cm
Subject: Dyslexia.; Dyslexia; Dyslexic children Education.; Curriculum development; Inclusive education; Literacy; Education.

Contents

  1. About the Author xiv
  2. Other Books by Gavin Reid xvi
  3. Foreword xviii
  4. Preface xxi
  5. Defining Dyslexia
  6. Defining Dyslexia
  7. Purpose of Definitions
  8. How Should We Define Dyslexia?
  9. Definitions
  10. Barriers to Implementing Policy
  11. Rose Review and Dyslexia
  12. Education for Learners with Dyslexia
  13. Different Perspectives and Agenda
  14. Points for Reflection
  15. Explaining Dyslexia: The Range of Research
  16. Causal Modelling Framework
  17. Genetic Factors
  18. Neurobiological Factors
  19. Visual and Temporal Processing
  20. Magnocellular Visual System
  21. Procedural Timing
  22. Hemispheric Symmetry
  23. Processing Speed
  24. Phonological Processing
  25. Phonological Awareness and Multisensory Programmes
  26. Morphological Processing
  27. Glue Ear
  28. Cognitive Skills
  29. Metacognition
  30. Environmental Factors
  31. Additional Language Learning
  32. Dyslexia in Different Orthographies
  33. Self?]disclosure in Adults
  34. Points for Reflection
  35. Assessment: Issues and Considerations
  36. The Context
  37. Assessment Aims
  38. Discrepancy Criteria
  39. Listening Comprehension
  40. Componential Model of Reading
  41. Curriculum Focus
  42. Why an Assessment?
  43. How? The Assessment Process
  44. Effect of an Assessment
  45. Assessment—Points to Consider
  46. Some Other Considerations
  47. Assessment and Inclusion
  48. The Bilingual Learner
  49. Points for Reflection
  50. Identifying Needs
  51. The Context
  52. Information Processing
  53. Factors That Can Prompt Concern
  54. Linking Assessment with Intervention and Support
  55. Key Aspects of an IEP
  56. The Overlap
  57. Assessing Performances
  58. Criteria: Summary
  59. Whose Responsibility?
  60. Early Identification
  61. Models of Identification
  62. Expert/Intervention—Attainment
  63. Barriers to Learning
  64. Whole?]School Involvement
  65. Points for Reflection
  66. Assessment: Approaches and Resources
  67. The Use of Tests—Points to Ponder
  68. Assessment and Information Processing
  69. Cognitive Measures
  70. Assessment of Processing Skills
  71. Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing (CTOPP?]2)
  72. Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests
  73. Gray Oral Reading Tests (GORT?]5)
  74. Standardised/Psychometric Criteria
  75. Standardisation
  76. Psychometric
  77. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT?]II and III)
  78. Comment
  79. Phonological Representation and Assessment
  80. Screening
  81. Curriculum Assessment
  82. Miscue Analysis
  83. Assessment in Context
  84. Assessment for Learning
  85. Metacognitive Assessment
  86. Multiple Intelligences Approaches
  87. A Components Approach
  88. Observational Assessment
  89. Observational Framework
  90. Systematic Observation
  91. Summary
  92. Points for Reflection
  93. Reading—Social, Cultural and Government Perspectives
  94. The Social Context for Literacy
  95. Literacy and Culture
  96. Defining Literacy
  97. Critical Literacy
  98. Challenging Assumptions
  99. Government Initiatives
  100. Literacy Standards and International Comparisons
  101. PISA Study
  102. Literacy Initiatives
  103. Points for Reflection
  104. The Acquisition of Literacy
  105. What is Reading?
  106. Factors to Consider
  107. Reading as a Process
  108. Reading Skills
  109. Reading Practice
  110. Developing Reading Skills
  111. Key Factors
  112. The Development of Reading
  113. Stages of Reading Development
  114. Limitations of the Stage Model of Reading
  115. Reading and Memory
  116. Relationship Between Phonology and Orthography
  117. Dyslexia and Different Orthographies
  118. Points for Reflection
  119. Reading Models and Methods
  120. Bottom?]Up and Top?]Down Models
  121. Connectionist Models
  122. Balance Model of Reading
  123. Method of Teaching Reading
  124. Developing Reading Skills
  125. Teaching Reading—the Debate
  126. Reading Interventions
  127. Methodological Issues in Reading Intervention Research
  128. Factors to Consider in Developing and Using Reading
  129. Approaches
  130. The Literacy Experience
  131. Framework for Teaching
  132. Summary
  133. Points for Reflection
  134. The Acquisition of Literacy: Spelling
  135. Why is Spelling Difficult?
  136. Systems Involved in Spelling
  137. Spelling Skills
  138. Spelling Development
  139. Spelling Policy
  140. Spelling Strategies
  141. Spelling Materials
  142. Points for Reflection
  143. Expressive Writing
  144. The Importance of Writing
  145. Relationship Between Writing and Spelling
  146. Expressive Writing: The Process
  147. Cognitive Skills Associated with Writing
  148. Writing in the Curriculum
  149. Developing Metacognitive Skills through Writing
  150. Metacognitive Strategies for Writing
  151. Strategies for Writing
  152. Motivation and Writing
  153. Planning
  154. Pre?]writing Framework
  155. Developing Ideas
  156. Handwriting
  157. Summary
  158. Points for Reflection
  159. Teaching Approaches: Points to Consider
  160. Overview of Approaches
  161. The Context
  162. Assessment and the Curriculum
  163. The Learner
  164. Programmes and Approaches—Some Considerations
  165. Overlearning
  166. Principles
  167. Issues
  168. Points for Reflection
  169. Supporting Literacy: Individualised Programmes
  170. Criteria for Selection
  171. Orton–Gillingham (OG)
  172. The Hickey Multisensory Language Course
  173. Bangor Dyslexia Teaching System
  174. Letterland
  175. Reading Recovery
  176. Toe by Toe: Multisensory Manual for Teachers and Parents
  177. Alternative Approaches
  178. Comment—Issues to Consider
  179. Points for Reflection
  180. Supporting Literacy: Approaches and Strategies
  181. Phonics Instructional Approaches
  182. Language Experience
  183. Other Support Approaches
  184. Phonological Approaches
  185. High?]Interest Books—History
  186. Barrington Stoke (www.barringtonstoke.com)
  187. Start to Finish Books
  188. Differentiated Texts
  189. Visual Factors
  190. Motor Aspects
  191. Assisted Learning
  192. Summary
  193. Points for Reflection
  194. Supporting Learning
  195. Effective Learning
  196. Key Points about Learning
  197. The Learning Process
  198. Realising Potential
  199. Zone of Proximal Development
  200. Developing Learning Skills
  201. Learning Strategies
  202. Multiple Intelligences
  203. Study Skills
  204. Set Goals
  205. Feedback
  206. Memory—Some Strategies
  207. The Role of Self?]esteem
  208. Creativity and the ‘Gifted’ Dyslexic Student
  209. Summary
  210. Points for Reflection
  211. Inclusion: Curriculum Access
  212. The Context
  213. Responding to the Diverse Needs of Students
  214. The Challenges
  215. Meeting Curriculum Objectives
  216. Index for Inclusion
  217. Tensions and Contradictions
  218. Assessment, Need and Accountability
  219. Removing Barriers to Achievement
  220. Interventions and Inclusion
  221. Making the School Inclusive
  222. Equity
  223. Principles of Inclusion
  224. An Inclusive School
  225. Healthy Schools
  226. Supporting Inclusion
  227. Staff Support and Training
  228. Student Advocacy
  229. Dyslexia and Self?]advocacy
  230. Staff Support
  231. Key Factors
  232. Points for Reflection
  233. Inclusion in Secondary Education: Accessing the the Curriculum
  234. Responsibility
  235. Features of Secondary Schools
  236. Differentiation and Curricular Development
  237. Differentiation and Assessment
  238. Subject Areas
  239. Multiple Intelligences in Secondary Schools
  240. Physical Education
  241. Staff Development
  242. Challenges: Key Areas
  243. Points for Reflection
  244. Inclusion: Further and Higher Education and the Workplace
  245. Further and Higher Education
  246. The Workplace
  247. Concluding Comment
  248. Points for Reflection
  249. The Role of Parents
  250. Parental Concerns
  251. Parental Support
  252. Parents’ Challenges
  253. Parents as Partners
  254. Points for Reflection
  255. Multilingualism: Challenges and Responses
  256. Background and Context
  257. Cultural Factors
  258. Culture?]fair Assessment
  259. Teaching
  260. Key Principles
  261. Metacognitive Awareness/Schema
  262. Concluding Points
  263. Points for Reflection
  264. The Overlap—Dyslexia: Attention, Coordination, Auditory Processing and Numeracy
  265. Introduction
  266. The Overlap Dilemma
  267. Attention Issues
  268. Identifying and Defining Attention Difficulties
  269. Intervention
  270. ADHD and Creativity
  271. Coordination, Movement and Handwriting
  272. Intervention Strategies—15 Tasks to Try
  273. Handwriting
  274. Dysgraphia Strategies
  275. Early Intervention
  276. Auditory Processing
  277. Intervention
  278. Difficulty with Numbers
  279. Reading in Mathematics
  280. Diagnosing Dyscalculia
  281. Intervention
  282. Points for Reflection
  283. The Use of Computers and Technology
  284. Introduction
  285. Approaches Using New Technology
  286. Resources—Computer Programs
  287. British Dyslexia Association New Technologies Committee (BDA NTC)
  288. Comment
  289. Points for Reflection
  290. Positive Dyslexia
  291. The Background
  292. Five Key Factors
  293. How Dyslexia Affects Children’s Learning
  294. Metacognition
  295. Encourage Creativity
  296. Provide Feedback to Students About Their Own
  297. Personal Progress
  298. Encourage Self?]assessment
  299. Develop Student Responsibility
  300. Enhancing Creativity
  301. Concluding Comment
  302. Points for Reflection
  303. Appendix 1 Some Popular Tests for Dyslexia that Can Be Used by Teachers
  304. Test of Phonological Awareness, Second Edition: Plus (TOPA-2+) (2004)
  305. Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing, Second Edition (CTOPP-2) (2013)
  306. Launch Into Reading Success—Test of Phonological Awareness (1997)
  307. GORT-5: Gray Oral Reading Tests, Fifth Edition (2012)
  308. TOWRE-2—Test of Word Reading Efficiency
  309. Second Edition (2012)
  310. WIST (Word Identification and Spelling Test) (2004)
  311. DIBELS
  312. Bangor Dyslexia Screening Test
  313. Dyslexia Screening Test—Junior (DST-J) (2004)
  314. Dyslexia Screening Test—Secondary (DST-S) (2004)
  315. Dyslexia Screener (2004)
  316. Cognitive Profiling System (CoPS) Version 5.1 (2010)
  317. Special Needs Assessment Profile
  318. WIAT-II UK for Teachers (2006)
  319. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT-II)
  320. (UK Norms and III US and Canada Norms Only)
  321. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT-II)
  322. (UK Norms and III US and Canada Norms Only)
  323. Phonological Assessment Battery Revised (PhAB-2 )
  324. HAST-2 Helen Arkell Spelling Test
  325. Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT 4)
  326. Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning
  327. Second Edition (WRAML-2) (2003)
  328. Test of Auditory Processing Skills—3 (TAPS-3)
  329. Appendix 2 Further Contacts
  330. International
  331. North and South America and Canada
  332. Australia and New Zealand
  333. Europe
  334. Middle East
  335. Asia
  336. Africa
  337. Other Websites
  338. Organisations
  339. Articles and Reviews About Dyslexia
  340. Literacy
  341. References
  342. Index