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Animality in British Romanticism: the aesthetics of species

Animality in British Romanticism: the aesthetics of species

Heymans, Peter, 1983-

The scientific, political, and industrial revolutions of the Romantic period transformed the status of humans and redefined the concept of species. This book examines literary representations of human and non-human animality in British Romanticism

eBook, Hardback, Electronic resource, Book. English.
Published New York; London: Routledge, 2012
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Details

Statement of responsibility: Peter Heymans
ISBN: 0203114868, 0415507308, 9780203114865, 9780415507301
Intended audience: Specialized.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: viii, 224 p. ; 24 cm.
Series: Routledge studies in romanticism ; 16
Subject: English literature 19th century History and criticism.; Animals in literature.; Literature.; Romanticism Great Britain.
Series Title: Routledge studies in romanticism ; 16.

Contents

  1. Selected Contents: Introduction: The Aesthetics of Species
  2. Part I
  3. 1. The Environmental Ethics of Alienation: The Ecological Sublime
  4. 2. Green Masochism: Coleridge's "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
  5. 3. Hunting for Pleasure: Wordsworth's Ecofeminism
  6. Part II 4. Humans and Other Moving Things: Wordsworth Visits London (with Deleuze and Guattari)
  7. 5. The Cute and the Cruel: Taste, Animality and Sexual Violence in Burke and Blake
  8. 6. A Problem of Waste Management: Frankenstein and the Visual Order of Things
  9. Part III
  10. 7. Revelation, Reason, Ridicule: The Scientific Sublime
  11. 8. A Taste of God: Natural Theology and the Aesthetics of Intelligent Design
  12. 9. Beauty with a Past: Evolutionary Aesthetics in Erasmus Darwin's The Temple of Nature

Author note

Peter Heymans is a Research Affiliate at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.