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The Oxford handbook of the Georgian theatre, 1737-1832

The Oxford handbook of the Georgian theatre, 1737-1832

Swindells, Julia, editor of compilation; Taylor, David Francis, editor of compilation

This Oxford handbook provides an essential guide to theatre in Britain between the passing of the Stage Licensing Act in 1737 and the Reform Act of 1832. Written by specialists from a range of disciplines, the 40 essays both introduce students and scholars to the key texts and contexts of the Georgian theatre and also push the boundaries of the field, asking questions that will animate the study of drama in the 18th and early 19th centuries for years to come

Hardback, Book. English.
Published Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013
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Available: Newton Park

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Details

Statement of responsibility: edited by Julia Swindells and David Francis Taylor
ISBN: 0199600309, 9780199600304
Intended audience: Specialized.
Note: Includes index.
Physical Description: 656 pages : illustrations (black and white) ; 25 cm.
Series: Oxford handbooks of literature
Subject: Theater Great Britain History 19th century.; Performing Arts.; Theater Great Britain History 18th century.
Alternative Title: Georgian theatre, 1737-1832
Series Title: Oxford handbooks of literature.

Author note

Julia Swindells was a writer and teacher in Cambridge. She authored Glorious Causes: The Grand Theatre of Political Change, 1789-1833 (2001), and co-edited Pickering & Chatto's edition of eighteenth-century women's theatrical memoirs (2007-8). Her other books include Victorian Writing and Working Women (1985) and, as editor, The Uses of Autobiography (1995).

David Francis Taylor is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Theatres of Opposition: Empire, Revolution, and Richard Brinsley Sheridan (2012), as well as a number of articles on the political contexts of theatre in the Georgian period.

Description

The Oxford Handbook of the Georgian Theatre 1737-1832 provides an essential guide to theatre in Britain between the passing of the Stage Licensing Act in 1737 and the Reform Act of 1832 - a period of drama long neglected but now receiving significant scholarly attention. Written by specialists from a range of disciplines, its forty essays both introduce students and scholars to the key texts and contexts of the Georgian theatre and also push the boundaries

of the field, asking questions that will animate the study of drama in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries for years to come.

The Handbook gives equal attention to the range of dramatic forms - not just tragedy and comedy, but the likes of melodrama and pantomime - as they developed and overlapped across the period, and to the occasions, communities, and materialities of theatre production. It includes sections on historiography, the censorship and regulation of drama, theatre and the Romantic canon, women and the stage, and the performance of race and empire. In doing so, the Handbook shows the centrality

of theatre to Georgian culture and politics, and paints a picture of a stage defined by generic fluidity and experimentation; by networks of performance that spread far beyond London; by professional women who played pivotal roles in every aspect of production; and by its complex mediation of contemporary

attitudes of class, race, and gender.

Reviews

exceptionally clear ... an indispensable teaching resource ... Showcasing the very latest research in this field in an accessible and detailed manner, and capturing all of the vibrancy and dynamism of the Georgian theatre, this Handbook will remain a vital resource for those teaching and researching Georgian culture for many years to come.
David Kennerley, BARS Review||The Oxford Handbook of the Georgian Theatre 1737-1832 is a superb achievement, not only because it is the most comprehensive guide to the period's theatre to date, but also because it showcases a fine and fascinating body of intellectual work-one that extends well beyond its pages and is changing how we view theatre and drama, from the Licensing Act through the Romantic era.
Terry F. Robinson, Eighteenth-Century Fiction||Beautifully illustrated, lucidly organized, and, above all, powerfully argued, The Oxford Handbook of Georgian Theatre 17371832 provides not only an authoritative reference guide, but a compelling read from cover to cover.
Susan Vallandares, Review of English Studies