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Masters and servants in English renaissance drama and culture authority and obedience Mark Thornton Burnett

Masters and servants in English renaissance drama and culture authority and obedience Mark Thornton Burnett

Burnett

Drawing upon archival material as well as the drama, popular verse and pamphlets, this book reads representations of masters and servants in relation to key Renaissance preoccupations. Apprentices, journeymen, male domestic servants, maidservants and stewards, Burnett argues, were deployed in literary texts to address questions about the exercise of power, social change and the threat of economic upheaval. In this way, writers were instrumental in creating servant 'cultures', and spaces within which forms of political resistance could be realized

Book. English.
Published Basingstoke: MacMillan, 1997
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Available: Newton Park

  • Newton Park – One available in Store 822.2/BUR

    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    00229404 Store 822.2/BUR Standard Available

Details

ISBN: 0333694570, 9780333694572
Physical Description: 225p.
Series: Early modern literature in history
Subject: Renaissance; English Drama

Contents

  1. Acknowledgements
  2. Abbreviations and Conventions
  3. Introduction
  4. Apprenticeship and Society
  5. Crafts and Trades
  6. Carnival, the Trickster and the Male Domestic Servant
  7. Women, Patriarchy and Service
  8. The Noble Household
  9. Bibliography
  10. Index

Reviews

'...an impressive work which sifts through a wealth of material...the arguments he advances about what the master-servant relations reveal about early modern English society's attitudes toward class, power, and sexuality make this work [incisive and useful to students of the Renaissance]...his treatment of masters and servants in early modern British culture is...quite masterful.' - Julie H. Kim, Early Modern Literary Studies

'...our most compelling study yet of the ways in which service was represented in the cultural documents of early modern England.' - Douglas Bruster, Shakespeare Quarterly