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Dialogue and literature: apostrophe, auditors, and the collapse of romantic discourse

Dialogue and literature: apostrophe, auditors, and the collapse of romantic discourse

Macovski, Michael Steven

Extending and modifying the works of Bakhtin, Gadamer, Ong and Foucault, this treatise constructs a theoretical model of dialogic romanticism and applies it to a range of Romantic texts. The author argues that dialogic forms and meanings are particularly pronounced during the Romantic epoch

eBook, Electronic resource, Book. English.
Published New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994
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Details

Statement of responsibility: Michael Macovski
ISBN: 0199855188, 9780195069655, 9780199855186
Note: Description based on print version record.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: 1 online resource (xii, 231 p.)
Subject: Dialogue.; Romanticism Great Britain.; English literature 19th century History and criticism Theory, etc.; Discourse analysis, Literary.; English literature 20th century History and criticism Theory, etc.; Reader-response criticism.

Description

Extending and modifying the works of Bakhtin, Gadamer, Ong, and Foucault - though drawing primarily on Bakhtin's theory of dialogue - Macovski constructs a theoretical model of `dialogic romanticism' and applies it to a range of Romantic texts. Literary discourse is seen as a composite of voices - interactive voices which are not only contained within the literary text but extend beyond it, to other works, authors, interpretations, and discourses. Macovski holds that

varieties of dialogic forms and meanings are particularly pronounced during the Romantic epoch, and accordingly traces the manifestations of dialogues within Romantic discourse, beginning with Wordsworth and Coleridge and extending to those nineteenth-century prose works most often treated as

`Romantic': Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights, and Heart of Darkness.