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Revel, riot, and rebellion: popular politics and culture in England, 1603-1660

Revel, riot, and rebellion: popular politics and culture in England, 1603-1660

Underdown, David

In this pioneering synthesis of social history and popular culture, David Underdown shows that local differences in popular allegiance in the Civil War coincided with regional contrasts in the traditional festive culture

Paperback, Book. English.
Published Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005
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Available: Newton Park

  • Newton Park – One available in Main Collection 942.06UND

    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    00056806 Main Collection 942.06UND Standard Available

Details

Statement of responsibility: David Underdown
ISBN: 0192851934, 9780192851932
Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 300-313) and index.
Note: Originally published: Oxford: Clarendon, 1985.
Physical Description: xii, 324 p., 8 p. of plates : ill., maps ; 20 cm.
Subject: Social Conditions; Politics; Politics and culture England History 17th century.; Stuart Period; England; Great Britain Politics and government 1603-1714.; 17Th Century; England Social life and customs 17th century.; Great Britain History Stuarts, 1603-1714.

Author note

David Underdown is Professor of History at Yale University. His other publications include: Fire From Heaven: Life of an English Town in the Seventeenth Century (1992).

Description

What have maypoles, charivari processions, and stoolball matches to do with the English Civil War? A great deal, argues David Underdown.

Using three western counties as a case-study, he shows that the war was neither a dispute confined to the elite nor a class struggle of the 'middling sort' against a discredited aristocracy. It was in fact the result of profound disagreements among people of all social levels about the moral basis of their communities; commoners as well as ruler held strong opinions about order and governance. But these opinions varied from place to place, and through a pioneering synthesis of social history

and popular culture, Underdown relates political diversity to cultural diversity, and shows that local difference in popular allegiance in the Civil War coincided with regional contrast in the traditional festive culture. The book is thus an important reinterpretation of both the English Revolution

and the relationship between society, politics, and culture in the seventeenth century.

Reviews

the real strength of his study lies in its illuminating detail. In page after page he reveals the intimate, domestic behaviour of ordinary rural people.
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