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Fracture and fragmentation in British romanticism

Fracture and fragmentation in British romanticism

Regier, Alexander, 1976-

Explains why 'fracture' and 'fragmentation' are two crucial concepts in Romanticism

Paperback, Book. English.
Published Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012
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Available: Newton Park

  • Newton Park – One available in Main Collection 820.9007/REG

    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    00316378 Main Collection 820.9007/REG Standard Available

Details

Statement of responsibility: by Alexander Regier
ISBN: 1107411777, 9781107411777
Intended audience: Specialized.
Note: Originally published: 2010.
Physical Description: 258 p. ; 23 cm.
Series: Cambridge studies in Romanticism ; 81
Subject: Romanticism Great Britain.; Literature.; English literature 19th century History and criticism.; English literature; Romanticism
Series Title: Cambridge studies in Romanticism ; 81.

Contents

  1. Broken origins: an introduction
  2. 1. A brotherhood is broken: Babel and the fragmentation of language
  3. 2. Figuring it out: the origin of language and anthropomorphism
  4. 3. Forces trembling underneath: the Lisbon earthquake and the sublime
  5. 4. A blue chasm: Wordsworth's The Prelude and the figure of parenthesis
  6. 5. Letters from the grave: John Keats's fragmented corpus
  7. 6. The doubling force of citation: De Quincey's Wordsworthian archive
  8. 7. Philological fractures: Paul de Man's Romantic rhetoric.

Reviews

Review of the hardback: 'This is a valuable study with much to offer on the problem of language in Romantic discourse, on the question of Romanticism more generally, and on our relationship to it. The book presents an incisive and resourceful intervention in current critical debates around Romantic culture, and Regier's consistently sophisticated and often illuminating readings repay careful attention as well as detailed critical engagement.' Andrew Bennett, New Books on Literature||Review of the hardback: 'This is a valuable study with much to offer on the problem of language in Romantic discourse, on the question of Romanticism more generally, and on our relationship to it. The book presents an incisive and resourceful intervention in current critical debates around Romantic culture, and Regier's consistently sophisticated and often illuminating readings repay careful attention as well as detailed critical engagement ... the book constitutes a consistently engaging study which helpfully enlarges our sense of the fragment in Romantic culture, and of what Romanticism might be, how it might work, and how it encompasses and still directs our thinking about nature, language and the human.' Review 19 (nbol-19.org)||'Fracture and Fragmentation in British Romanticism is clear and persuasive, and provides a fresh way of thinking through the importance of Romanticism then and now.' The Year's Work in English Studies