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Early childhood studies: a social science perspective

Early childhood studies: a social science perspective

Ingleby, Ewan

This title explores key issues in early childhood studies from a social science perspective, exploring how social science can offer explanations to many aspects of human behaviour

eBook, Paperback, Hardback, Electronic resource, Book. English.
Published London: Continuum, 2012
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Available: Online

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    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    2249474-1001 E-book Online Available

Details

Statement of responsibility: Ewan Ingleby
ISBN: 1441125302, 1441132279, 1441156143, 1441171193, 9781441125309, 9781441132277, 9781441156143, 9781441171191
Intended audience: Specialized.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: 240 p. ; 24 cm.
Subject: Preschool children.; Early childhood education.; Child Care.

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. 1. Psychology and Early Childhood Studies
  3. 2. Sociology and Early Childhood Studies
  4. 3. Social Policy and Early Childhood Studies
  5. 4. Pedagogy and Early Childhood Studies
  6. 5. Enhancing Learning and Early Childhood Studies
  7. 6. Research Methods and Early Childhood Studies
  8. Conclusion
  9. Answers
  10. References
  11. Index

Author note

Ewan Inglebyis Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Sciences and Law at Teesside University, UK, where he teaches on the Education MA and PhD, and the Early Childhood Studies BA.

Reviews

An excellent contribution to the arena of Early Childhood Studies which clearly demonstrates the benefits of examining Early Years from multiple perspectives. Not only does the author define psychology and sociology as workable theories within social sciences, but through the application and analysis of social policy the students are guided into developing the interconnections between theory, pedagogy and reflective practice. The research chapter (7) is particularly well positioned, leaving the reader with the impression that they are being effortlessly guided towards research as a normal expectation within on-going 'good' Early Years practice.||A well structured, clear and detailed book for foundation and undergraduate students of Early Childhood Studies. This book provides a multi-disciplinary view which places the child at the centre of the learning process. It encourages practitioners to engage with theoretical perspectives and consider best practice through case studies in order to support students' development as reflective practitioners.||An amazing text, that is easy to read and engaging from start to finish. I can't recommend this text highly enough. It is an essential text for any Childhood studies or Education studies students.